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TDMAMBA
06-22-2005, 09:43 PM
Ok recently I've been searching for a vehicle. I'm looking at an SUV vehicle because I don't like driving smaller vehicles. I want an SUV because of the security, durability, and the AWD will help in winter. I'm interest in Fords mostly. Ok while I'm not going to say the amount I have a little bit over 2,000 dollars in my checking account. I can afford to make a maximum of 2,000 dollars at the most for a down payment.
I came across the 1997 Ford Expedition. http://www.autotrader.com/dealers/view/vdetail.jsp?productWebsite=aaautosales&dealer_id=93932&car_id=183918488
Today we went out to take a look at it. The price was $6,850, But the dealer says that they don't finance cars because the interest rate is too high. My mom tried to apply me through the bank but they declined it saying that I don't have credit. How am I supposed to build it if I can't get it any.
The point of this thread is does anyone know of a site that has REAL truthful and quick ways to get Auto Financing that's worked for anyone here. ANY HELP WILL BE GRAVELY APPRECIATED!! I'D LOVE TO DRIVE THAT EXPEDITION UP TO CP. :sun:

Kyle L
06-22-2005, 09:47 PM
I'm not big on financing, but if the car is offered through a dealer, there should be a way to be able to finance it. But most will not let you, since there is a pink slip, where you buy it as is. Thats what people face with buying a used car, is the pink slip, claiming you can't just bring it back saying you don't like it. Once you buy it, its yours.

An expedition eh? Those are gas guzzlers to the max. If you're looking for a SUV, you may want to look into others. If you have your heart set on the Expedition, go for it, but Ford SUV's are for the most part, not that great. I absolutley hate Explorer's, Expeditions aren't too bad. I would just look around, you definetley want to get something reliable. (Ford's aren't that high on the reliability scale).

TDMAMBA
06-22-2005, 09:50 PM
Well my mom drives a 2000 ford Explorer XLT. It's had its problems but it's been reliable for the most part. They also had a 1995 chevy Tahoe for the same price too.
I forgot to mention. This wasn't a ford Dealership but a car lot.

Wes
06-22-2005, 09:59 PM
What I had to do on my first car was have my dad co-sign the loan.

When you have no credit, they are reluctant to give you credit. I know it's stupid, but that's the way they work.

I'd recommend getting a small credit card of $500 keep it paid off and then that way you can get your credit estabilished.

Just don't go crazy with the credit cards like I did. Once you get one, the mailings will start coming from other banks.

Good luck. Oh and by the way, SUV's are not really that much safer than passenger cars from what I've heard. When you crash a SUV is so much heavier and is going to cause a lot more damage.

Brian P
06-22-2005, 10:15 PM
There are a few ways you can get credit. I'm 18, and in the same boat....we'll sort of, I just bought a brand new car. One option is to get a credit card and use it a tiny bit each month. It will build credit, how quickly though, I'm not sure. Another option, if your parents are willing, is to have them cosign the loan. Thats what I did. So basically one of the two people are responsible for paying the payment, and they will use the credit of the person with the best (i.e. that of your parents). This allows you to finance the car and it will build your personal credit for the future!

willski2002
06-22-2005, 10:35 PM
Ummm.....just a tip, don't get an American car. Generally they are worse than a Nissan, Toyota, Honda, BMW, Mercedes, etc. Look for a CRV, Pathfinder, or a RAV-4/4-Runner. Those cars don't eat up as much gas as a Ford, plus they are more reliable.

Get a credit card (easy since you have perfect credit) and use it for a few months, making sure to pay it off right away. Then, you'll have perfect credit and you can get a loan.

Steven
06-22-2005, 10:40 PM
My question is why would you want an Expedition when they generally suck up gas, plus they do have some reliability issues. Of course, they are good for doing damage (just watch American Chopper).

You would end up forking out over $2000 per year in gasoline right now with an Expedition. My car, a 1995 Olds Cutlass Ciera, I only spend $1400/year, plus even though it's got a smaller engine, I've regularly passed or out-accelerated Expeditions :).

TDMAMBA
06-22-2005, 11:10 PM
Well I'm also interested in some of the Chevy SUV"s too. Chevy's aren't all that bad. I want a car with a strong engine, Large, Good for trips, and got AWD for in the winter time. I've driven my mom's XLT Explorer and I'm used to it. I guess part of the reason I'm interested in an Explorer or Expeditition is that I'm used to the one we have at home. I think I could handle it. It would be good experience to start with something like that.
Also I'm just not all into the Urban cars. Maybe the area in which you live can impact the gas. See for me, right now I'd just mostly be going back and forth to work. Mostly high way miles and my mom has a horse at a barn. I could use the hitch of the expedition to help tow a trailor of that sort if she ever needed to. To us once you move up in cars you can't go back down unless you rich enough to own multiple cars.

RaptorXLC
06-22-2005, 11:26 PM
I can't really give you much on financing, but be warned, SUV's and especially older ones are gas hogs, and you're gonna be dishing out big bucks for gasoline, and the prices are only gonna get higher. And as someone else said, suvs are just as safe as a lot of smaller cars(toyotas and hondas for example)

TDMAMBA
06-22-2005, 11:35 PM
I'm actually ready for it. I have alot of spare money that I used to save up for a car. I would put my check every 2 weeks into the bank. But when you say older SUV's , what time frame are you referring to? Sure all cars may be the same material but still, I'd rather be in the Expedition that hit the Civic than the Civic that got hit by the Expedition.

RaptorXLC
06-22-2005, 11:43 PM
by older i just meant used. You're not getting a new SUV, and gas mileage is always improving, so in a lot of cases the older the car the worse gas mileage you'll be getting. It's not a HUGE deal, but it's just something to keep in mind, cause you don't have unlimited funds, and as I have learned, it's pretty easy to spend a lot of money quicker than you plan.

TDMAMBA
06-22-2005, 11:50 PM
Thanks for the tips. I willl and have always kept those kind of things in mind. If I got an older explorer it will mostly be 1996 or older with a V6 engine. This expedition is a 1997 with a I think a 4.6 liter V8 engine. There's also right next to it a 1995 Chevy Tahoe with a V8 engine.I'm not settled on an expedition it's just that I like the deal they had at the lot but I need a way to finance it. I have my reasons on why I prefer SUV's. personal preference and other reasons.

Kyle L
06-22-2005, 11:51 PM
Well I'm also interested in some of the Chevy SUV"s too. Chevy's aren't all that bad. I want a car with a strong engine, Large, Good for trips, and got AWD for in the winter time. I've driven my mom's XLT Explorer and I'm used to it. I guess part of the reason I'm interested in an Explorer or Expeditition is that I'm used to the one we have at home. I think I could handle it. It would be good experience to start with something like that.
Also I'm just not all into the Urban cars. Maybe the area in which you live can impact the gas. See for me, right now I'd just mostly be going back and forth to work. Mostly high way miles and my mom has a horse at a barn. I could use the hitch of the expedition to help tow a trailor of that sort if she ever needed to. To us once you move up in cars you can't go back down unless you rich enough to own multiple cars.

You should know the difference between AWD and 4WD.

AWD: Is full time, all wheel drive. The car has a respectivley weaker all wheel drive mode, because its designed for it to always be on. Its weaker than 4WD. You cannot switch out of AWD.

4WD: Four Wheel Drive machines, such as my SUV, provide you with many options and modes. I have 4 modes of 4WD, along with 2WD. While I'm on the pavement, its on 2WD, saving my car some gas and extra hassles with only two wheels going. I can switch it into many, MANY modes of 4WD that are suited for different situations, offroad, climbing hills, and super steep hills (4LD +EP). If you really need the offroad capabilities, you will need 4WD. If you just need snow traction on roads...etc...AWD will be okay. But it may prove more hassles in the future when you have to do service.

Matt M
06-23-2005, 12:29 AM
Seriously if you don't want a tiny car get a pickup or a yukon or something. SUV's are just irritating because they're a car, but slightly higher up and maybe 2 feet longer with half the gas mileage.

And BTW, good choice on the 4WD. I have to drive my mom's 92 Suburban, and aside from just vomiting gas at 7mpg, the thing doesn't have 4 wheel drive or all wheel drive and the back end slides out and fishtails like none other when it's wet and especially when it's snowing.

Byron
06-23-2005, 10:03 AM
I would highly suggest considering a Japanese SUV instead of a Ford. Not only does Ford seem to have some really serious quality control issues, but Japanese cars are the most reliable of all manufacturers (Honda and Toyota are, stay away from Nissan). If you absolutely must get a Ford, be warned that the following cars contain a faulty cruise control switch that may catch fire at any time (even when the car's not in use).

Lincoln Mark VII/VIII from 1994-1998
Ford Taurus/Mercury Sable and Taurus SHO 2.3 L 1993-1995
Ford Econoline 1992-2003
Ford F-Series 1993-2003
Ford Windstar 1994-2003
Ford Explorer without IVD 1995-2003
Ford Explorer Sport/Sport Trac 2002-2003
Ford Expedition 1997-2003
Ford Ranger 1995-2003

So far, only like 560 of those cars have reported spontaneous fires, though...so I guess your odds are pretty good.

TDMAMBA
06-23-2005, 12:42 PM
My Dad's got a 1998 Mitsubishi Galant. While the car is in pretty crappy shape as far as a missing hub cap from a blown tire, non working radio, and a dent from my mom's explorer the car itself has run pretty good. But the explorer my mom's got also works good also. I dont think all Ford SUV's are that bad. If Explorer's are crap then why are the the Number 1 selling SUV since they debut in 1991?
The point of my thread though wasn't about the kind of car I was going to get. But rather has anyone found an unknown way that's easy to finance a car under 10 thousand dollars. The reason I liked the expedition was that it was big, good for a trip (Especially for CP) and a good price at 6,850 dollars. The expedition would actually IMO surpass my expectations of the car I'm looking for.

Steven
06-23-2005, 01:32 PM
Byron brought up a good point about the Fords, given how they are one of the many vehicles with a defective switch that causes the thing to catch fire (I remember in one article they specifically mentioned a 97 Ford Expedition).

In my opinion, GM SUVs are more rugged and reliable than Fords, and some are better mileagewise than Fords. Even if you have to go a bit older, repair costs are also less. You would probably want a Tahoe/Yukon (possibly even a Trailblazer) and not a Suburban or Yukon XL or Denali.

TDMAMBA
06-23-2005, 02:36 PM
I like GM SUV's too. I'll try and look on it. But remember I can't get too Fancy I'm on a budget here. Something $8,000 or less would be preferrable.

willski2002
06-23-2005, 02:45 PM
^ Look, don't buy an American car. Please don't do it. Get a Toyota or a Honda or something. The reason the Ford Explorer is the number 1 selling vehicle is because it was the only midsize SUV for quite a few of those years. Just because a car is bestselling doesn't mean it's a good car, but it can be an indication.

Banjo4321
06-23-2005, 03:52 PM
I have a 2002 Ford Escape and I love it. It's bigger than a sedan, but it's also smaller than the Explorer.

Diesel
06-23-2005, 09:16 PM
I'm not big on financing, but if the car is offered through a dealer, there should be a way to be able to finance it. But most will not let you, since there is a pink slip, where you buy it as is. Thats what people face with buying a used car, is the pink slip, claiming you can't just bring it back saying you don't like it. Once you buy it, its yours.


What? If you finance a car, you sign a promissory note with the lender, which is usually a bank. The bank pays the dealer for the car, and the dealer is done with you. For the most part, dealers don't care if you're paying cash or financing. The only existing issue that they would care is that with a cash payment, you're guaranteed that you'll be leaving with the car if you like it. If the dealer has to fool with financing, there's a chance that you won't be accepted and then the dealer has wasted time when he could have been selling to someone else. Regardless, you own the car and the "pink slip" whether you pay cash or finance. The only difference is a lienholder's name on the vehicle's title.

Back to financing tips. It sounds like you want this now. If so, I would not recommend the credit card. You won't have enough time to establish credit and instead it will increase your credit risk as it will look like you're panicking to get credit from anywhere.

You've said that you have extra cash, have you considered a higher down payment? With less loan, the lender is at a lesser risk than if you put down no money and lenders will be more willing to accept your risk.

Also, if you have this extra cash to pay a higher interest rate, you may want to consider a hard-money lender (one who does little risk assessment in issuing loans and to compensate for the increased risk assigns higher interest rates).

Cosignors are another alternative.

Once you get the car, and make timely payments, you'll begin to build a solid credit history.

I financed my last vehicle with peoplefirst.com. They've since been bought by Capital One Auto Finance. Their rates are damn good, but I do believe that they have moderately strict loan underwriting guidelines. You can apply online.

Do your loan research without applying. You don't want all of the inquiries on your credit report. Find lenders that have programs for first time buyers with little or no credit.

TDMAMBA
06-24-2005, 02:16 AM
Thank you Diesel you actually got to the whole point of why I posted this thread.

Kyle L
06-24-2005, 02:40 AM
What? If you finance a car, you sign a promissory note with the lender, which is usually a bank. The bank pays the dealer for the car, and the dealer is done with you. For the most part, dealers don't care if you're paying cash or financing. The only existing issue that they would care is that with a cash payment, you're guaranteed that you'll be leaving with the car if you like it. If the dealer has to fool with financing, there's a chance that you won't be accepted and then the dealer has wasted time when he could have been selling to someone else. Regardless, you own the car and the "pink slip" whether you pay cash or finance. The only difference is a lienholder's name on the vehicle's title.

Back to financing tips. It sounds like you want this now. If so, I would not recommend the credit card. You won't have enough time to establish credit and instead it will increase your credit risk as it will look like you're panicking to get credit from anywhere.

You've said that you have extra cash, have you considered a higher down payment? With less loan, the lender is at a lesser risk than if you put down no money and lenders will be more willing to accept your risk.

Also, if you have this extra cash to pay a higher interest rate, you may want to consider a hard-money lender (one who does little risk assessment in issuing loans and to compensate for the increased risk assigns higher interest rates).

Cosignors are another alternative.

Once you get the car, and make timely payments, you'll begin to build a solid credit history.

I financed my last vehicle with peoplefirst.com. They've since been bought by Capital One Auto Finance. Their rates are damn good, but I do believe that they have moderately strict loan underwriting guidelines. You can apply online.

Do your loan research without applying. You don't want all of the inquiries on your credit report. Find lenders that have programs for first time buyers with little or no credit.


No I got mixed up with two different things, I'm not too keen on financing. The bank might be a good place to go....I guess. :confused:. Take it from the people that have done it, not me. I just paid with straight up cash.

I'm still wicked sketchy about Ford SUV's. GM makes a better SUV, but directed towards a different buyer market, the same as your Expedition though. I drive a 1994 4Runner, and love everysingle bit of it. I personally feel that Toyota makes the best SUV's and Trucks, their lineup is hard to beat. 4Runner, Land Cruiser, Rav4 (Kinda Pinner), Sequoia, Tacoma, Tundra. They are really reliable cars, and provide a lot of practibility, (proabobly more than any other car manufacturer). Its just that Ford SUV's have been plagued with so many problems, and the explorer never seems to get up-to date with current demands.

Diesel
06-24-2005, 06:09 AM
Thank you Diesel you actually got to the whole point of why I posted this thread.

I always stay on topic.

When does everyone think that Melvin Mora will return to the Orioles' lineup?

antfarm007
06-30-2005, 12:55 AM
I think the older Japanese SUVs are junk.

If you're looking at an SUV for sure, I'd recommend an old Jeep Cherokee or Grand Cherokee. Both are smaller SUVs, but they were built solid.


For new cars, I'd say that all of the "mainstream" brands are about the same (GM, Toyota, Chrysler, Ford, Honda, etc.)

I'd say avoid the smaller foreign brands (Kia, Suzuki, Mazda, etc.). Brands you might think are good like Land Rover and Volvo are actually total crap.

For the crap American cars get, the US manufacturers really don't want you to have problems with their new cars, and they'll work hard to fix any problems you get.

Quality gaps between Asian and US manufacturers have really been cut in the past 10 years or so. If you're looking at a car 10+ years old, go Japanese. Cars today it doesn't really matter. None of the manufacturers want to hear about problems, so they will all take excellent care of you.

Big thing is to look at where the cars are made. Cars made in Japan are tops, US/Canada second, elsewhere behind that. The Japanese companies have some factories here, but the products aren't nearly as reliable as the ones that came from Japan years ago. As the Japanese companies are forced to move some of their production from Japan to other Asian countries, quality will drop. However, most of this production stays in Asia anyways.

TDMAMBA
06-30-2005, 01:10 AM
Don't jeeps though , have the highest roll overs than any other SUV out there? I could have sworn I remember hearing about that somewhere?

antfarm007
06-30-2005, 12:25 PM
The really, really old Jeeps (early 80s) may have been more likely to roll over than other cars back then. But then again, you have to remember that Jeeps were the first "SUVs" on the road.

CBS or NBC did a broadcast back then proclaiming Jeeps were unsafe, but in reality, they set up the tests so the cars would roll over. To get something like 10 rollovers, they had to go through about 450 tests. This isn't really saying anything great about Jeeps, but the tests were also under unreasonable conditions, having the cars accelerate at full speeds and having the turns performed at over double the maximum steer rate an average driver reaches in an emergency. Bottom line is to really examine what you are hearing on TV or from a friend.

SUVs do have higher rollover rates than cars. There is no denying it, the higher center of gravity is the cause. As long as you don't drive like a moron and try to make turns at unreasonable speeds, you'll be fine.

Diesel
12-14-2006, 01:12 PM
So TDMAMBA what ever became of this? Where did you get your financing? How much did you put down? What interest rate did you get?

TDMAMBA
12-14-2006, 04:30 PM
I never had to get a new car in the first place. When my mom passed, last August I got her car pretty much. A 2000 Ford Explorer with a 5.0 V8 engine. In no way shape or form was that the way I wanted a car! :( :sadface:

Marc
12-14-2006, 11:00 PM
Ouch, that sucks.

Have you considered building your credit so when the time comes to get a car loan or otherwise need good credit, you will have it? It's not something that happens overnight. Actually it takes quite a bit of time to build. No better time to start than the present.

Cuddy
12-14-2006, 11:07 PM
No kidding. Tomorrow should also mark my last car payment for a few more years anyway...as it will be the last time I have to give money to AmeriCredit (who financed my car).

Brian F
12-15-2006, 02:35 AM
^ Believe me- it's great not having payments. I've had my truck paid off for over two years, and it's not quite halfway worn out yet. I'm going to enjoy the heck out of another 5-7 years of payment free driving!

By the way, I'll compare 7 years worth of repair expenses on my '96 F-150 up against any similar "foreign" make any day. ("Foreign" meaning that the profits go overseas, but the vehicle is made by American workers)

No, a full-size 4 wheel drive truck isn't going to get mileage like a Kia, but for the utility of the truck and the increased accident survivability, I'll pay for the gas.

Someone mentioned the fire issue with cruise control switches on trucks like mine- that recall was finished almost a year ago.

rich12_16
12-15-2006, 03:17 AM
Psh. I feel dumb. I know absolutely nothing about cars.

ClicheCoaster
12-15-2006, 03:35 PM
I'd consider an escape over an expedition (but not a 2001 escape). Check out car repair forums, Escapes don't come up often and if they do it is often the 2001-2002 years (1st two years it was available). They get relatively good gas mileage and come in 4WD varieties. If you have steady income of $20,000/year or more you should also be able to finance a new car through a dealership and there are great year end rebates available on escapes right now.